The Naturist Talks: Kim & Peter from Australia

The Naturist Talks: Kim & Peter from Australia

One of the main reasons why we started this project is to show the world that naturists are not some strange dark commune but that actually everyone could be one… Or could enjoy being one if they took the first step.

 

Our main example of “everyone” is of course ourselves, we write posts about naturism in general but also about our own experiences. But some of you might be thinking “Yes sure, those two are probably just the strange kids in the block…” (nah, we know you’re not thinking that about us, but we’re trying to write an introduction here). So we decided to let other naturists have a word as well.

 

So please sit back and get inspired!

 

Meanwhile we already published interviews with people from all over the world. You can find them in the The Naturist Talks section.
Today we’ll be listening to Kim and Peter from Australia, make sure you’ve been to the toilet and have a fresh coffee because they have a lot to tell.

 

Hello Kim and Peter, tell us something about yourself
Who are we? Well we’re a middle aged couple living in Sydney, Australia with three children and four grandchildren. We enjoy travel and try to as often as possible, getting “Off-Road” and cruising. Peter works in telephony with interests in Photography and Amateur Radio and Kim works in medical administration as well as being a qualified Nail Technician, the type you hit with hammers by accident not the straight steel ones.

So Nudist or Naturist? Well what’s in a name anyway? While there are often long winded and sometimes heated discussions on the web about this topic with some very diverse points of view on the subject, which often have geographical variances, so they seem to be interchangeable. If we had to choose one, say when describing what we do to the uninitiated, we’d go with Naturists as opposed to Nudists. Simply because it softens the impact and more often solicits additional questions on the subject.

 

However if you’re wondering what we’d actually prefer to be called well that’s easy, Kim and Peter as there’s more to us than the whole no clothes thing and a single label seems completely inadequate to describe the multiple layers that makeup a person or couple. Though we’re sure that when discussions about us and our activities are held in our absence people will add their own terminology and concepts to describe us.

 

How and at what age did you become a naturist?
Kim and I have been traveling and living light, or nudist or naturist or whatever term sits with you, for almost two decades now following what could be best described as a somewhat confusing start.

 

Back in 2003 we had planned to go away for a weekend with some friends and had been looking at various accommodation options within a few hours of Sydney. I suggested by email a place called Bardots, which has sadly now closed, as something a little out of the ordinary. In the e-mail I sent I made full mention of the clothing optional nature of the place and while Kim seemed cautiously accepting of the idea I was expecting to have the suggestion laughed out by our friends. Well I was somewhat surprised that it wasn’t, either that or I’d had my bluff called, so two rooms were duly booked and deposit paid with nothing further discussed on the subject.

Then while shopping less than twenty four hours before we were due to check in we had a call from our friends to discuss a few details for the weekend and when they heard we were shopping the question was asked “So is Kim getting a new bikini for the weekend?”. I must admit that while not out of character, given the situation I thought the question a little odd. My response of “Why would we do that? I assumed we just swim nude given the resorts clothing optional.” Was met with a stunned silence of the kind that doesn’t need the sound of a solitary cricket to drive home the fact that something was not quite right.

 

“Are you serious? Wait let me look at the website again….. You weren’t joking!”. To this day I’m unsure if they really thought I was joking or they’d simply not looked closely enough at the web page either way some discussions where to follow. So with our shopping done we headed to our friends place where we split into two groups along predictable lines to “sort out the details” and later that evening it was decided that we’d still go after all the deposit was non-refundable.

 

On the way home that night the Kim mentioned what the girls team had discussed and to their credit it was a very thorough and reasoned review of the situation, they’d analyzed the place’s website, discussed the point that everyone will be nude, that they trusted their husbands and besides if it’s really bad we can just leave. So what did we guys discuss? A new amateur radio. Now in our defense I have to say we’re guys and it was a very nice radio. As well as this I think we both simply accepted the futility of us discussing this at all. As is always the case the deciding vote was with our wives and we just have to abide by the referees decision on the matter. We don’t often get away for weekends so when we do we want our wives there to share the experiences.

 

As to the weekend well it was memorable for many reasons and while the whole nudity thing did have a somewhat delayed start as we’d arrived late on the Friday night there was no “immediately nude” event, well there was in our room but that was nothing unusual for Kim and I, no that would wait for the warmth, and full glow, of the following day’s sun.

 

For me leaving the room for breakfast with nothing but a towel to sit on was what seemed right at the time if this was because I’d consciously decided to “just do it” I honestly don’t remember but that’s how I approached the situation. Kim chose to take a towel and wear a sarong which while quite sheer still afforded her some cover, a security blanket if you will, and in no time at all we were joined at breakfast by our friends who’d interestingly enough made similar clothing choices. After breakfast, and probably more cups of tea than we’d normally have, we headed for the pool where the weekend’s biggest lesson was learned.

 

To this day Kim can recall the terrifying feelings that engulfed her just prior to removing her sarong in broad daylight in front of friends and strangers alike. That she did this in spite of these feelings speaks volumes as to her strengths. The fact that immediately following this nothing happened, no one stared, no one pointed and laughed, made it almost an anticlimax really. I have even heard some say that in this situation there was almost a feeling of disappointment, a feeling of “Look I’ve done it! Where’s my applause?” and even “What I’m not worth staring at?”. These feelings soon pass.

 

Unusual is relative, that is to say what one person may find unusual is actually quite normal or mundane for another, and while the day had seemed to us to have been somewhat unusual, something was about to occur that was even more unusual than simply being nude in the company of friends and strangers alike and it happened when we got off our stomachs and headed to the pool. In no time at all we started to play, like children. Here are some 40 something’s, well Kim was still a thirty something, with jobs, dogs and mortgages playing like a bunch of ten year olds kids throwing a ball around. This was something that for us was very unusual. Sure we’d visit the ‘places’ and see the ‘sights’ but this was a change and our travels would never be the same again.

In the end we can credit this decision to rescue our deposit with changing our lives we have made many new friends, good friends, and experienced things most people would never even consider doing. We’ve enjoyed the glaciers of Alaska, the Islands of the Caribbean and Hawaii, the deserts and beaches of the Kimberly’s and even an art exhibition in the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra all from the comfort of our own skin.

 

Is naturism allowed in your country and what’s the public opinion?
I’m not a lawyer so the only answer I can give is “Well yes and no”.
That said we have legalised nude beaches in most states, Queensland with it’s nude friendly climate actually has none and of late there seems little to indicate a change on this point. We have resorts and venues in all states and our laws aren’t overly restrictive. As an example of this we can be nude in our backyard as long as we can’t be seen from a park, school or road, however if the neighbours can see us then that’s OK. They don’t have to look.

 

Above all of this though Australia has space and lots of it. This means finding a deserted stretch of beach or river is easily done or simply a picnic in a quiet place in the bush.

 

What do you think is the best and worst thing about naturism?
Peter: The best things would be the people we’ve met and the experiences we’ve shared with them.
The worst would have to be the perceptions of others, especially those that claim to “know” what really goes on with the inference that as soon as we started taking our clothes off, our promiscuity suddenly shot up, something I believe Nick & Lins have also mentioned. Thankfully these aren’t the people in our lives whose opinions concern us very much.

Kim: I’d certainly agree with Peter on the best things about naturism we have meet some fascinating people many of whom have become good friends.
As to the worst, while I’d also agree with Peter I’d also add cold! Air conditioning set for people wearing layers of clothes isn’t exactly brilliant when nude.

 

Do you find it easy to make naturist friends?
Kim: On the whole I find naturists to be more approachable and definitely more outgoing. This seems to apply even before they get undressed as was demonstrated by Sharron who on seeing me sitting with four peoples luggage prior to a cruise walked up to me and said “you do realise this is a nude cruise?”. We became friends almost immediately to the point that they’ll be joining us for Christmas and New Years.

 

Peter: Yes and we certainly have! Though I’m not sure I know why that is exactly. The standard explanation is usually that without clothes we’re forced to be ourselves rather than some manufactured image we want to project to the rest of society. I however think that the types of people that can look at something like social nudity and see the concept for what it is well enough to make the leap outside their comfort zone are more likely to be the kind of people you’d like to meet. Of course this doesn’t mean you won’t meet some people you’d go out of your way to avoid but we seem to be able to spot them very quickly.

 

What’s the best tip you have for beginning naturists?
Kim’s Advice: Pick a family oriented venue and perhaps go during a quieter time if possible, such as during the week, as it will feel a lot less daunting. Certainly take a friend or partner along and when you arrive relax into the experience.

Peter: GO AWAY!
Seriously just go away, grab a friend, find a venue out of town or even better interstate and go there. This may seem a somewhat strange sort of advice but if you’ve decided to give it a try for the first time this approach, similar to what we did, has a number of benefits.

 

Firstly it removes, or at least makes harder, the ability to back out. If you’re faced with a six hour drive home or having to arrange flights or alternate accommodation you’ve a lot more incentive to go through with it.
Secondly you’re less likely to meet someone you know. Now I know those of us that are accustomed to social nudity will say this actually isn’t an issue, Kim and I have made many trips to places like this just to meet people we know, but it’s more than likely been a discussion point for the uninitiated and is for them a genuine concern.
Finally if you’re traveling the distance you’ll more than likely stay longer, getting to experience more and get to know the people better.

 

Anything else you’d like to share with our audience?
Kim: It really is surprising just how natural it can become, so natural in fact that we didn’t realize it until we started to think about this question. Some years back Peter and I traveled to the Kimberley Region in the North of Western Australia. We met up with our friends from our first naturist experience at, quite literally, a hole in the middle of the desert and after a few days of traveling though what could be best described as fairly harsh, yet stunningly beautiful, country we found ourselves camped at a location called James Price Point. This is a place that will live long in our memories, it’s remote location means that it’s facilities were limited to sand, soil, salt water and gravity to stop it all floating away but our campsite atop dark ochre cliffs gave us commanding views over white sandy beaches and the vast expanse of the Indian Ocean to the horizon where it met with the clear blue western sky.

 

Within moments of us setting up camp the single word ‘beach’ was spoken and even though there were other campers, in the vicinity acknowledgment of the idea was given by the group simply stripping off, grabbing towels and heading down the roughly hewn steps in the cliff to the beach and then into the warm welcoming waters of the Indian Ocean. That nobody stopped to ask “what should we wear” showed us just how relaxed and natural nudity had become for us in these situations.

 

While we were swimming we noticed there was a ‘lifeguard’ on duty. Stationed at another campsite this vigilant individual stood there with his binoculars surveying the area of beach we’d chosen to use, obviously watching for potential threats to our safety, until we returned to the safety of our campsite. While the two other campers in the area paid little or no attention to our beach activities this guy seemed trans fixed by it all while we remained unconcerned by his constant gaze.
That night as we discussed the days activities around our campfire we came to the view that if your life had reached the point where watching a group of middle aged people skinny dipping from such a distance that even binoculars would have been of little use in rendering a clear image of the event was the highlight of your day then perhaps it was time to get a new one.

 

Peter: Most of what we’ve said relates to social nudity that is being naked around friends and strangers alike. What we haven’t mentioned is being nude and how that is. While on the surface you may think there is little difference between wearing little and wearing nothing, there is in fact a large difference in the way you experience your surroundings.

 

Whether the environment is the warm waters of the Mediterranean or all the cool floors and harsh escalators of the National Gallery, being nude changes greatly the experience. It makes it more intense, more personal and yes it can sometimes even add a feeling of exposure.
It is said that a picture is worth 1000 words, so may I offer for your consideration the following 2000 words. These photos were taken less than 30 seconds apart and show us in front of a glacier in Alaska. Obviously the first image was for a more Conservative audience while the second was for those more accustomed to us and our preference for traveling lighter.

 

 

The light robes we are wearing in the first image did not provide much in the way of additional warmth and in the second image you can clearly see that we were subject to a greater level of sensory input it was clearly a far more immersive, but not uncomfortable, experience. Of course this is what you want when you travel. However if you would have rather been standing inside the air conditioned vessel looking out through a panoramic window I would question why you were there at all, after all could you not have just saved yourself the time and money by watching the travel channel on the big screen at home?

 

Thank you so much for your participation Kim and Peter!

 

Do you also want to tell your story and experiences in naturism? Please get in touch via the CONTACT page! As long as we have people who like to contribute, we can keep The Naturist Talks running!

10 thoughts on “The Naturist Talks: Kim & Peter from Australia

      1. Not good or bad just different.
        Ppl usually dont talk tooooo much here ,just few words as answers and thats it, you guys seem like ppl that love to talk haha and im not saying this either in a good or a bad way, its just a notice ,comparing to all the others that did the naturist talk section.
        But i guess , from what i`ve leared so far in general, Aussies are pretty friendly and well.. more open ,rahter as just talking or in any other ways.
        Thats what i`ve noticed anyway.
        Btw ,maybe i missed it, are ur kids and grand kids nudies as well?
        If not ,do they know that u guys are?

        1. We ok our kids with us on a BNTT in 2010 and they loved it. While they were nude at times on the cruise we wouldn’t consider them nudists. Our grandkids however are different. Two of them are very young and while we don’t refer to them as nudist clothes aren’t exactly their friends especially when our pool is concerned.

          As to the length of the answers that’s a result of the approach we took and how we see things. Firstly we discussed what we wanted to say and as there’s two of us that tended to make the responses longer.

          We also wanted to explain why and what figuring there will may be future nudists reading this as well and touching on our experiences so they learn there more to it than a bunch on naked people in some remote location press ganged into playing volley ball for eighteen hours a day.

          We don’t mind being called different, after all it better than being called normal.

          1. Oh dont get me wrong, i liked the “talk” cause it WAS different, rather then almost like a cop criminal q&a haha yes yes no no no yes no,ok.. lol.
            Well anyhow consider ur selfs lucky cause ur Aussies ,and thanx for the replies.

  1. Nice one Kim and Peter – I really enjoyed reading your article.

    It’s a good bit longer and with more detailed anecdotes than some of the other ones, and it works nicely!

    Sounds like you’ve had some lovely experiences of naturism – well done! Sounds awesome.

    1. Thanks, glad you liked it.

      We have some fantastic experiences and while we could have had these clothed I’m not sure they’d have been the same, certainly Alaska would have been less intense.

      Though the real difference seems to be the people we’ve meet on our travels, they certainly made them memorable.

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